Saskatoon Steakhouse Restaurant Greenville SC http://saskatoonrestaurant.com Mon, 17 Jul 2017 13:00:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 Saskatoon Steakhouse Restaurant Greenville SC Saskatoon Steakhouse Restaurant Greenville SC http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://saskatoonrestaurant.com Nadine Grzeskowiak: Episode 018 – Gluten Free RN http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/nadine-grzeskowiak-episode-018-gluten-free-rn/ http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/nadine-grzeskowiak-episode-018-gluten-free-rn/#respond Mon, 17 Jul 2017 13:00:01 +0000 http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/?p=2364  

Nadine is a Registered Nurse who worked in emergency departments and trauma centers for 18 years in Oregon. At age 40 her health deteriorated so rapidly she was certain she only had 6 months to live. She was diagnosed with Celiac disease and started a gluten free diet; within 2 weeks she felt much better and slowly nursed herself back to health.That was the impetus for her starting her own business in 2007 called RN on Call and becoming a gluten intolerance / Celiac disease educator.

4:20
Even after working in the ER for 18 years I had never heard of Celiac disease. The doctor who diagnosed me said it was extremely rare and that I could no longer eat gluten. Wheat, barley and oats were basically breakfast, lunch and dinner for me, and depending on how my shifts would go I would have a beer or two after work. I went to New York and was tested again and my Celiac panel and my skin biopsy came back negative. I stayed on the GF diet though and within 4 months I had gotten so much better I started my first business, RN On Call, which is basically me managing other peoples’ healthcare.

5:30
As a nurse I was so horrified by what I found out about gluten and Celiac disease that I started the Gluten-Free RN.

In the beginning when I started the GF diet I was still eating very poorly. I went to doctors and nutritionists and no one was really telling me what healthy actually was; I was just replacing foods with GF versions like pasta, and using GF soap. After 4 years my body still had not recovered enough, and I had deficiencies and anemia, so eventually I moved to dairy-free and soy-free and went on the paleo diet around 2011 and that was the game changer.

My friend Cain lives in Bend, Oregon and he started Paleo Magazine and was the one who originally suggested I go paleo with he and his wife. I tried it solidly for a year and after that everything had shifted. My body composition shifted; my labs were fabulous; I no longer had autoimmune diseases, all because I changed my diet.

9:30
When I originally started GF RN my intent was to educate my fellow healthcare providers, and only in the last few years are doctors starting to look at their patients completely differently. In fact the doctor who said I didn’t have celiacs disease ended up calling me a few months later and said she had been incorrect and that she had shifted to a GF, dairy-free, soy-free diet and that I shouldn’t eat corn either.

Why do you think some people stick with paleo and others don’t? Why is it so hard for people to do?
People either quit or they stop paying attention; there can be a lack of support from family or friends or partners; peer pressure from people at work; misinformation at the gym; a lot of times it’s just because food is addictive. Carbs are addictive, a lot of Americans have yeast overgrowth, and they want to eat sugar; high-carbohydrate food, white flour–it all turns into sugar and until you give your intestines 6 months to a year to heal; all these people are at risk of falling off the gluten-free or paleo bandwagon. It takes that long for your cells in your body to rid themselves of that need for carbohydrates. It can be tough, especially for people who don’t notice the benefits immediately or for people who don’t react to trace amounts of gluten. Some of us know immediately when we’ve had it.

The addiction is not just to the highly-processed carbs, it’s also whole wheat bread for example that people thought were healthy for years because your mom gave it to you. There’s the psychology and the physiology involved. The microbiomes are made up of many different bacteria; Yeast are a part of that and they want to eat that sugar, which the carbs turn into. There’s also the component where it actually has a morphine-like effect on peoples’ brain like a narcotic. People are medicating themselves with their food like a narcotic and it is very addictive. People are highly stressed and they want to treat or medicate themselves with food.

My entire household is GF, even the dog food. My 10-yr old daughter had belly pain and that was eliminated by eliminating gluten.

18:50
To test for gluten intolerance I encourage people to get a genetic test, which any doctor can order. I also recommend getting a baseline Celiac panel, which has at least 6 different components and is like putting puzzle pieces together. It’s also about symptomatics–do you have gut pain, do you have seizure disorders, nerve pain, diarrhea, constipation? It’s all related. I look at the big picture and put it all together.

It took me 9 years of collecting data and talking to people and going to conferences to get to where I felt comfortable enough writing my first book on a public health issue. The second book will be a more scientific book to revamp information we already have and presenting it in a way that makes sense.

Visit www.glutenfreern.com to access Nadine’s books, her podcast, social media, and to contact her.

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http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/nadine-grzeskowiak-episode-018-gluten-free-rn/feed/ 0   http://traffic.libsyn.com/thecavegourmet/wildgame1_170418_ep18_nadine_grzeskowiak.mp3 Nadine is a Registered Nurse who worked in emergency departments and trauma centers for 18 years in Oregon. At age 40 her health deteriorated so rapidly she was cer...   http://traffic.libsyn.com/thecavegourmet/wildgame1_170418_ep18_nadine_grzeskowiak.mp3 Nadine is a Registered Nurse who worked in emergency departments and trauma centers for 18 years in Oregon. At age 40 her health deteriorated so rapidly she was certain she only had 6 months to live. She was diagnosed with Celiac disease and started a gluten free diet; within 2 weeks she felt […] Saskatoon Steakhouse Restaurant Greenville SC
Darryl Edwards: Episode017: Primal Play http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/darryl-edwards-episode017-primal-play/ http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/darryl-edwards-episode017-primal-play/#respond Mon, 10 Jul 2017 13:00:22 +0000 http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/?p=2354 http://traffic.libsyn.com/thecavegourmet/wildgame1_170418_ep17_Darryl_Edwards.mp3

Daryl is a nutritionist and author of the books “Paleo from A to Z” and “Paleo Fitness,” and the founder of Primal Play—a daily online paleo program designed to help people rekindle their love of exercise.

Backstory:
My initial career was in tech as a computer programmer in investment banking, which was lucrative but required very long hours and a lot of stress. Things started to change when I started having annual health checks, blood work, and fitness tests done, and this was in my mid 30s. My doctor told me I had issues related to hypertension, high blood pressure, my cholesterol profile was poor, my blood glucose was in the pre-diabetic range, and my doctor said it was probably due to genetics and lifestyle. I was given a cocktail of meds as one option, which I’d have to take the rest of my life, which I didn’t want to do. I had Loren Cordain’s paleo book on my shelf, which is about going back to basics and thinking about what my body really needs, so I decided to reread it and that was the gateway for me. Just having the recognition that we were designed to live in a particular way and if we deviate from that significantly you’re going to suffer from chronic lifestyle diseases. In 3 months by changing my diet and exercise, everything had been normalized.

7:30
What kind of exercise did you start doing?
I had just started trying crossfit right before I had the tests done, and I was doing the zone diet at the time but had only had moderate success with that. I got bogged down with how meticulous you had to be with it (e.g. 9 almonds vs 10). I initially didn’t see the connection between diet and health; I moreso thought of its relation to aesthetic and performance in terms of getting better at CrossFit. When I recognized I had “lifestyle disease” I realized I needed to do it for health.

10:00
Paleo is about prioritizing the quality of the food and avoiding highly processed foods. My exercise improved so much over the 3 months of changing my diet to paleo I wanted to become an evangelical about this.

How did you transition into writing books about this?
I became a certified personal trainer and a certified nutritionist and started offering advice to colleagues friends and family, and eventually noticed I was enjoying this more than investment banking so I eventually got out of that and decided to dedicate my career to helping people improve their health and wellbeing.

13:00
I started a blog called fitnessexplorer.com and a publisher contacted me and asked if I wanted to write a book about paleo fitness. I wrote a book and got into public speaking and changed my approach to exercise. That was the second huge career change for me aside from getting out of investment banking. I realized I really didn’t enjoy exercise, but I love movement.

15:00
There’s a negative connotation of exercise, which comes from the punishment aspect, and when you’re a kid, you’re just playing outside with your friends and it’s fun, then when you go to school it becomes more restrictive and sometimes the enjoyment is removed. Once you’re past playing sports and games at school, it can become difficult to maintain that self-motivation to do it. I found even when I got into Crossfit and had an almost religious zeal about it, there were times I didn’t want to do it, I kept getting injured on a regular basis, and I only felt great when I’d beat my peers. I recognized what was missing was fun with movement. The only way I could realize that was having a playful approach— natural primal movements we should be engaging in but having a saturation of fun play around that. I am able to motivate myself to move whenever I have the opportunity, not just when it’s in my schedule. It’s now something I enjoy and I’m bigger, stronger and healthier as a result.

18:30
For someone who’s older (in their 40s or 50s) and they may be sedentary or they may run marathons/triathlons and are adhering to a healthy diet, what would your book application look like for someone fitting that profile to start moving?
The same way a person needs 1,2,3 meals a day and a certain amount of water each day, movements need a certain type and amount each day.
Certain healthful movements are also regenerative; you’re repairing your body by engaging these movements. I lived with terrible knee pain through my 20s and 30s and once I incorporated a wide variety of movements at different intensities and volumes it went away and I was able to heal.

27:00
Fitness is about health and longevity, not just short term goals.

Even if your diet is great but you’re sedentary, you can’t be healthy. If you’re exercising but not sleeping, you can’t be healthy. If you’re exercising but eating poorly, you can’t be healthy. You have to supplement your workouts with movement or physical activity, even if it’s just carrying packages from the local shop or giving piggyback rides—things that 20 years ago would’ve just been normal stuff. If you don’t engage with these kinds of movements or day-to-day things you have to do, you’ll lose the ability to do that.

Visit primalplay.com for more information about movement and incorporating more play in your life.

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Jimmy Moore: Episode 016: Livin La Vida Low Carb http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/jimmy-moore-episode-016-livin-la-vida-low-carb/ http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/jimmy-moore-episode-016-livin-la-vida-low-carb/#respond Mon, 03 Jul 2017 13:00:59 +0000 http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/?p=2350 http://traffic.libsyn.com/thecavegourmet/wildgame1_170418_ep16_Jimmy_Moore.mp3

At age 32, Jimmy Moore went from 410 lbs to shedding 180 lbs in one year, shrinking his shirt size from 5XL to XL, and his waist size by 20 inches. This dramatic weight loss left him inundated with questions and requests from people about how he did it. He is the author of multiple books since then, including the Ketogenic Cookbook. He is the host of the Livin La Vida Low Carb podcast.

6:00
In 2004 I read Dr. Atkins’ Diet Revolution, and he was emphasizing to eat fats but no carbs, so I tried the Atkins Diet by the book, and I lost 30 lbs in the first month. The second month I had so much energy I didn’t know what to do with it. I started going to the gym and just walking a little on the treadmill, so I lost another 40 lbs that month.

If your body gets that big, it’s going to fight you tooth and nail if you gain any back and then try to lose it again. That’s when the challenge becomes figuring out how to tweak things even further from there.

12:00
There’s a lot of misinformation around the Atkins diet now. Science has refuted a lot of what we’ve been told about health in general. The sugar industry pays researchers to be quiet about certain studies that would have basically damned sugar. The pharmaceutical companies are responsible for squelching knowledge as well.

15:00
The average consumer typically doesn’t understand that the USDA and their regulations are just like doctors–they need to be vetted by science. Many doctors haven’t been trained in nutrition science and they get their information from the USDA. Governmental agencies are bureaucrats, not nutrition researchers looking into their “dietary guidelines.” They are industry shills who have oftentimes been paid by Big Food or pharmaceutical companies.

19:00
Fasting is a learning experience; it’s like riding a bike—you’ll fall off and scrape your knee a few times but the more you do these fasts your body adapts. Bone broth, sea salt, and kombucha are helpful in the beginning, (although kombucha not recommended always bc the sugar mimics hunger in your body). If when fasting you don’t feel well and become really weak, you need to eat something. This is very helpful for people with severe metabolic damage and insulin resistance, but for many people this isn’t necessary. Eat ketogenic and it happens naturally.

25.00
Most people don’t believe me when I say hunger was/is not as bad as you think. You’re eating when you’re not eating. You’re eating your stored body fat; even for the leanest person, if you have just a little bit of body fat, you have 40,000+ calories worth of fat on their body to fuel them past a fasting period.

27.50
When you’re not putting food in your body how do you prevent muscle deterioration?When you eat an excess of carbohydrates your body converts it to body fat, so your body is storing up all of this energy to be used on demand when it’s needed. So when you go to burn that fuel that your body has stored away, (and it can only store so much carbohydrate in the form of glycogen in the muscles), then it gets turned into body fat. It can’t store protein, it actually has to convert any excess protein into glucose and then the glucose that doesn’t get used up as energy gets stored into body fat. We’re not storing muscles for energy, we’re storing fat. So why do people think when you start tapping into energy on the body it immediately goes for the muscles? You don’t burn up muscle because your body preferentially chooses the fat for fuel, especially in the context of a ketogenic diet or if you don’t eat anything at all.

32:00
To address people’s fear of slowed metabolism when fasting:
When you don’t eat any food at all you actually rev up your body’s metabolism by 10%. Partly because your body isn’t having to guess what the fuel source is. It’s much worse if you’re only consuming a 500 or 600 calorie diet with a few carbs in it, which makes it very difficult for your body to make that decision. Are we glucose burners or are we fat burners? It gets stuck in no-man’s land and that’s when your metabolism slows down. When you eat nothing after about a 48 hr period your body has no choice but to tap into those fat stores.

33:00
New technology has emerged making it easier to test your ketone level than in the 70s. There are different options at different price points.

38:00
There are supplements to take if you are struggling with ketosis for therapeutic purposes, especially early on when you’re starting a ketogenic diet. It is not meant to be in lieu of eating low-carb.

41:30
Type 3 diabetes and Alzheimer’s/dementia are essentially a disregulation in blood glucose levels, which is directly related to your carbohydrate intake and even your protein intake. Most chronic diseases of our day—(heart disease, cancer, neurogenerative diseases)—all come back to proper nutrition and controlling insulin levels, which is why a paleo / primal / low-carb ketogenic diet is so powerful. These are the answers to all of these metabolic issues that are causing the diseases of our day.

Visit livinlavidalowcarb.com for more information about Jimmy Moore’s work, books and his podcast.

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Rachel Straub: Episode015: “Weight training is essential for mobility and maintaining strength” http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/rachel-straub-episode015-weight-training-is-essential-for-mobility-and-maintaining-strength/ http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/rachel-straub-episode015-weight-training-is-essential-for-mobility-and-maintaining-strength/#respond Mon, 26 Jun 2017 13:00:10 +0000 http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/?p=2347 Rachel Straub has a B.A. in Chemistry from Carnegie Mellon, as well as Masters degrees in Exercise Physiology, Nutritional Sciences and Biokinesiology with a focus on Biomechanics. She is certified as a Strength and Conditioning specialist and coauthor of scientific papers published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine in the fields of Biomechanics, Sports Medicine, Nutrition and Computational Chemistry. Her papers have been published in multiple journals including the Journal of Strength; Conditioning Research; Nutritional Research; Electromyography; Kinesiology; and Nutritional Psychology. She is the coauthor of Weight Training Without Injury.

 

How did you come to write the book?

I met my coauthor Fred Stellabotte in high school because I was having postural issues and was advised to start weight training. Fred’s knowledge was enthralling so I ended up studying biomechanics, etc. in college, and his main focus was injury prevention. We just continued working together afterwards. The book is mostly about preventing injuries because so many people hurt themselves in the gym or lifting weights.

5:00

Is weight training something an older person can do?

Weight training is essential for mobility and maintaining strength, especially as you age. It’s recommended that everyone weight train at least 2 days per week. The problem is most people are afraid of it if you don’t know how to do it properly. It’s about learning basic moves on how to do them properly, which is what the book teaches you—the fundamentals, whether you’re wanting to do it in the gym or at home. You can apply these principles to any activity.

It’s normal when people get out of shape or haven’t worked out in a while to become motivated in the beginning to join a class like CrossFit or something to jumpstart their efforts. But there’s recent research that shows 2/3 of adults who join CrossFit get hurt, and the reason is it’s advanced—advanced movements that beginners don’t realize they don’t know they don’t have the ability to do and they get hurt. Your injury risk skyrockets if you don’t learn what you should and shouldn’t be doing and when to say no. Just because you’re in a class with a trainer doesn’t mean you’re immune from injury.

9:00

Certifications for personal trainers are not all the same and that’s why it’s important to educate yourself. Just because you’re getting your heart rate up and you leave feeling energized doesn’t mean you’re doing everything right at the gym.

11:00

The book has over 350 pictures demonstrating proper techniques to help you design a weight training program for yourself, then we focus on each of the main body parts. Next we have key points for safe and effective exercise from head to toe, explaining what is right and what is wrong. Learning proper technique is our purpose here. We start with squats, then lunges, then bench press and chest fly, for example. You have to understand the basic principles of everything before you can apply the techniques to different types of exercise equipment—and there are new developments in exercise machines every year. Basic positioning of your body with exery exercise is key, whether you’re using weights or not.

16:00

Are there exercises we should never do?

We show lap pulldowns for example—you should never do any exercises behind the neck and we explain why you shouldn’t be doing them. Roman benches (where people do extensions for their back)—you can blow up a herniated disc within minutes. Dead lifts: those are really for highly trained professionals only. You only should be doing exercises that you can do properly. There are exercises some people cannot do properly, and there are other exercises you should never do, like behind the neck pull-downs.

18:00

How do you explain exercising or weight training to someone who’s older or out of shape or generally unhealthy?

Everyone has their own challenges but it’s basically learning movement patterns and gradually increasing the intensity. Even if you’re not well it’s about maintaining mobility, which prevents you from suffering from aches and pains or postural illness. The book teaches movements that keep you moving, even if you’re not using weight. It’s really essential for long-term health. If you’re doing the movements properly you’re getting the full range of motion. The goal is to be healthy, maintain mobility, not get injured, and be free from aches and pains.

21:00

As you get older your injuries occur because you don’t have a range of motion.

But you typically can’t get a full range of motion if you’re using heavy weights. Both factors are essential.

Visit our website for links, the book, further information and articles, images, or for contact information: www.weighttrainingwoi.com

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Kirk Parsley: Episode014: Getting Better Sleep http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/kirk-parsley-episode014-getting-better-sleep/ Mon, 19 Jun 2017 09:00:59 +0000 http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/?p=2338
Dr. Kirk Parsley served as an Undersea Medical Officer at Naval Special Warfare Group 1 from 2009-2013. He is a member of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and is certified in Hormonal Modulation (age management medicine). After leaving the Navy, he went into concierge medicine and consulting, and continues to consult for corporations, pro athletes and teams. He has led research worldwide on sleep, wellness, and hormonal optimization, and is currently completing a book on sleep and health optimization. His philosophy for wellness is that we must live more closely to the way we evolved as a species. Many diseases and disorders we’ve developed in society are unnecessary combinations of poor sleeping habits, living in a toxic environment, eating foods we were not designed to digest, and allowing stress to overwhelm us.
5:00
How did you become a Navy SEAL and specialist on sleep?
8:41
I chose 2 professions that didn’t value sleep obviously. When you’re younger and your testosterone and hormone levels are higher it’s easier to manage, but as you get older and those levels drop it gets tougher. It’s ironic that the medical community, ostensibly the gatekeepers of health, required congressional action to reduce doctors’ hours to 80 a week.
How’d you go from obstetrics and gynecology to sleep?
The SEALs were willing to come and talk to me about things they didn’t want to talk about, things that might disqualify them from their jobs. One guy after another told me the same stories about a nebulous poor performance creeping in. They were having problems with body composition, memory, physical performance, sex drive, gym performance, just staying motivated and staying emotionally available, all kinds of stuff. I thought it was adrenal fatigue/combat stress, but the research available at the time wasn’t useful to me. I gradually ramped up my own knowledge by speaking to other experts in the field through this position.
17:00
What I was really trying to do was improve their hormones – their testosterone was low, their growth was low, their thyroid function, insulin sensitivity was poor; every kind of marker for these hormones was low. To boost these hormones naturally, everything came back to getting enough sleep. Once I tried this myself I realized it definitely was the answer.
24:00
When I was younger I thought 6 hrs of sleep was enough, people say when you get older you need less, but it’s the opposite. So many people who are very busy and stressed get 5 or 6 hrs of sleep, have a couple of Starbucks a day, and in the evening they drink wine or beer to help relax and go to sleep; they may or may not be sleeping well.
That’s the typical westernized industrialized way of life. Unfortunately with the advent of light bulbs and artificial lighting, we threw away a few million years of evolution.
26:00
There is no research that supports sleeping less than 7.5 hrs. The number comes from sleep adaptation, not how people historically slept.
31:00
So if we haven’t been sleeping 7.5 hrs on a regular basis, then you would initially sleep longer at first to make up that “sleep debt.” Your body repairs itself and grows when it’s asleep– everything happens and is better when you’re sleeping. That’s why it’s so important.
34:00
What are the basics of getting better sleep?
Getting people to believe that they need 7.5-8 hrs of sleep. In modern society we have to decrease the amount of light saturation going into our eyes, and then we have to decrease the stimulation of our brain and prevent it from interacting with the environment so much. That’s all sleep hygiene is.
The definition of sleep means that there’s a barrier between you and your environment, which you can be awakened from. Nutrition, exercise and stress control play into it—I recommend optimizing all four pillars of health—but nutrition impacts sleep a lot and sleep impacts your appetite and your food choices and willpower the next day.
39:00
What about taking a low dose of melatonin before bed? What is your sleep product?
Biohacking via pharmaceuticals (making your body do things it’s not supposed to do) isn’t a healthy or sustainable thing. So I recommend getting your diet under control and eating whole foods, and your insulin sensitivity will improve. You’ll also give yourself the micronutrients you need for your brain to be able to do what it should do.
As long as the melatonin dose is small enough to where it doesn’t interfere with your brain’s sensitivity to melatonin. My product is super low in melatonin, and it’s just enough to where your brain has to keep doing everything to keep going. My product helps consolidate the 3.5-4 hrs before bed that our ancestors did so you can push that down to a 30-45 min window. It’s good for people who do shift work or aren’t going to get adequate amounts of sleep, or anyone trying to dial their health back in. Some people use it for jet lag or intermittent stress periods.
Go to http://www.docparsley.com/ for the product or ways to contact me and find more information, as well as podcasts and other blogs.
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Dr. Kirk Parsley served as an Undersea Medical Officer at Naval Special Warfare Group 1 from 2009-2013. He is a member of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and is certified in Hormonal Modulation (age management medicine). Dr. Kirk Parsley served as an Undersea Medical Officer at Naval Special Warfare Group 1 from 2009-2013. He is a member of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and is certified in Hormonal Modulation (age management medicine). After leaving the Navy, he went into concierge medicine and consulting, and continues to consult for corporations, pro […] Saskatoon Steakhouse Restaurant Greenville SC
Hamilton Stapell: Episode 013: Modern Caveman http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/hamilton-stapell-episode-013-modern-caveman/ Mon, 12 Jun 2017 09:00:27 +0000 http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/?p=2335 Hamilton Stapell is a historian and Associate Professor of History at SUNY New Paltz, and the creator of one of the first college courses on ancestral health. He is also the Associate Editor at The Journal of Evolution and Health and the author of the published study “Modern Cavemen? Stereotypes and Reality of the Ancestral Health Movement,” which looks at stereotypes of those who follow the paleo lifestyle.

How did you become a historian on paleo?

I first got interested in evolution and health in 2002 when I stumbled across the book Health Secrets of the Stone Age by Philip J. Goscienski. This put evolution and health and nutrition together for the first time for me and it was a lightbulb moment.

4:30

I believe trying to align who we are genetically and evolutionarily with our environment is the future of health and medicine. There often seems to be a mismatch between who we are biologically, who we evolved to be, and the modern world in which we live. It’s a mismatch between what our genes expect us to be like and what our modern world is actually like. Those two things don’t often line up, and if we can work towards living in a way that’s more similar to our ancestral ways, that would lead to improved health outcomes.

I don’t think paleo is going to end but there was a lot of enthusiasm in 2013, but there were obstacles to it going mainstream. Cultural obstacles (dairy, grains, etc.,) are so deeply woven into society that it might seem very difficult to remove them. Bread, rice and corn are staples, and civilization was basically built because of agriculture, so to remove products of agriculture from civilization is a lot more difficult than some people realize. The second major obstacle is modern foods/carbs appear to be logically addictive so it’s hard to give up refined carbohydrates. Asking people to go paleo is asking them to give up 70% of what they eat on a daily basis (e.g. oils, flours, alcohol, etc.)—the 70% that’s most physiologically addictive, designed to be hyper-palatable by national corporations. They’re really good at designing foods that trigger your taste and satiety desires. The third obstacle is called social/value issues. Society in general values fun over long-term flourishing. We don’t focus on sacrificing for the future, but oftentimes that’s what’s necessary to focus on a paleo lifestyle. It takes effort and time, which runs counter to modern values of society.

20:00

Come to today and doctors refer patients to me for the paleo diet. Seven years ago it was 0% referral.

Paleo is becoming more accepted by more medical practitioners, but in terms of the mainstream medical community, there still seems to be a lot of resistance from professional medical organizations, although it’s multi-faceted, from protecting turf to disagreement over saturated fat or red meat consumption.

24:00

Knowing everything we’re up against in modern society, I still love the way a diet soda/drink tastes. I’m somewhat addicted. What can we do to become more in tune with the paleo lifestyle and to get fit? How can we combat that and embrace these different principles?

It’s complicated because we’re talking about behavior change. Why do people do it? Are they forced to do it because of their doctor or their spouse? It’s more than motivation and education. It comes down to finding what resonates with you.

27:00

If you connect with food or exercise or face-to-face communication, or being outside, it’s finding an entry point that works for you, having that work, feel better, (which leads to further change), and hopefully having that snowball. You turn off your computer at night, you wake up earlier and you feel better, you eat better, you want to exercise more, and ideally that’s how it should/would work.

Find out more at hamiltonstapell.com.

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Hamilton Stapell is a historian and Associate Professor of History at SUNY New Paltz, and the creator of one of the first college courses on ancestral health. He is also the Associate Editor at The Journal of Evolution and Health and the author of the ... Hamilton Stapell is a historian and Associate Professor of History at SUNY New Paltz, and the creator of one of the first college courses on ancestral health. He is also the Associate Editor at The Journal of Evolution and Health and the author of the published study “Modern Cavemen? Stereotypes and Reality of the Ancestral […] Saskatoon Steakhouse Restaurant Greenville SC
Melanie Avalon: Episode012: What, When, Wine http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/melanie-avalon-episode012-what-when-wine/ Mon, 05 Jun 2017 09:00:03 +0000 http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/?p=2332  

Before writing the #1 Amazon Bestseller, What, When, Wine Diet: Paleo & Intermittent Fasting for Health and Weight Loss, Melanie Avalon spent years researching the mechanics of body fat regulation. Weight loss techniques became lifestyle changes for health and happiness after she stumbled upon the substantial and healthy means of weight loss via dietary composition: low-carb, paleo, and timing (intermittent fasting). It sparked a fire to perfect a dietary lifestyle for effortless weight management and health.

How did the book come about?

Growing up and in college I was always trying so many different diets to lose weight, but when I stumbled into the low-carb realm, I realized there was something going on with what we eat vs. counting calories, which changed my food paradigm. That was so effective and I felt better, which is why I became interested in the science of fat burning, food, and what we eat. Then I discovered intermittent fasting where you restrict the hours you eat each day vs. the amount of food you eat, so it’s more of a lifestyle vs. a diet. I felt fantastic and started to see health issues clear up—no more headaches, my energy levels improved, etc. Next I adapted paleo where I basically cut out grains, sugar, and inflammatory foods, and that was when all the pieces really fit together and pulled me out of the dieting mindset and into this really sustainable, amazing change. I felt so amazing I wanted to tell the whole world so I wrote a book.

12:13

Tell us exactly what intermittent fasting is and how it works:

The idea is to minimize your eating time and maximize your non-eating time. About 12 hrs after your last meal is when you start to get the benefits of fasting. Your body changes from relying on what you just ate and stored carbohydrates and switches to burning more body fat. This leads to very easy weight loss and more energy. You could skip breakfast, breakfast and lunch, dinner, just breakfast or just breakfast and lunch. You don’t restrict yourself to any amount of calories during your selected window. I basically feast every night, I’m not hungry during the day, I have tons of energy, and I don’t feel like I’m dieting.

17:05

Many people don’t realize that eating can actually make us tired because we use up a lot of energy because the body has to process that food. Humans aren’t meant to be eating all day. Historically that’s not how human beings evolved. If I eat during the middle of the day now I get tired and have blood sugar swings.

21:15

Is it possible for someone in their ’50s and older to get “cut” or “shredded” and slim — for example, a woman who’s 5’6″ and 140lbs. to be 120 lbs. through paleo and intermittent fasting?

People should be able to strive for whatever weight they desire, as long as it’s healthy for your body, so I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wanting to become super lean, for example. There are certain points of weight loss where the body is going to perceive a super low weight as a stressor and not healthy, which can be difficult to maintain. But it’s definitely possible. Paleo will take you to a very lean state. If you want to get to a super shredded state you probably need to bring in paleo plus more exercise and possibly intermittent fasting. You have to get to the point where your body has nowhere to turn but your stored body fat.

24:00

Talk to us about functional exercise.

Exercise isn’t about going and running on a treadmill per se, it’s about movement and living life and burning the energy we’re taking in. I can’t remember the last time I went to a gym but I move a lot. Rather than do strength training, I buy ankle/wrist/vest weights, and I wear them when I’m just doing tasks around my apartment like cleaning or just walking around. Do whatever makes you happy and moving, but my point is you don’t have to go to CrossFit 5x a week.

29:14

Let’s talk about wine. Red, white, organic?

I drink a lot of wine, which has always been a piece of the puzzle that kind of haunted me, but low-to-moderate intake of wine is a very healthy thing. Correlation studies show moderate drinkers have very good longevity compared to abstainers, just specifically with wine though. The compounds in grapes serve as antioxidants and support the immune system, for example. Red wine seems to have more health benefits than white, likely due to the compounds you get from red grape skins that aren’t found in white. In general I recommend organic because grapes are one of the highest produce for pesticide use, which affects the genetic makeup and it’s hard to escape that. Moderation is key though. 1/2 – 1 glass per night.

34:00

What would you recommend to adolescents or teenagers who are overweight?

It depends on the type of person they are. Do they prefer to have structure and rules and a plan laid out? If they’re the type that is more of a moderationist and doesn’t like feeling controlled, you could do a transitional approach where you slowly cut things out. Figure out who they are and then make sure they’re willing to commit, because it’s mostly about mindset and really cultivating the idea that food isn’t about restriction, it’s about what you can have and moving towards health.

38:30

Melanieavalon.com is my blog and has all my info posted there. You can get my book on Amazon.

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  Before writing the #1 Amazon Bestseller, What, When, Wine Diet: Paleo & Intermittent Fasting for Health and Weight Loss, Melanie Avalon spent years researching the mechanics of body fat regulation. Weight loss techniques became lifestyle changes for ...   Before writing the #1 Amazon Bestseller, What, When, Wine Diet: Paleo & Intermittent Fasting for Health and Weight Loss, Melanie Avalon spent years researching the mechanics of body fat regulation. Weight loss techniques became lifestyle changes for health and happiness after she stumbled upon the substantial and healthy means of weight loss via dietary […] Saskatoon Steakhouse Restaurant Greenville SC
Cassy Joy Garcia: Episode011: Fed and Fit http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/cassy-joy-garcia-episode011-fed-and-fit/ Mon, 29 May 2017 13:00:10 +0000 http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/?p=2327 Cassy is the author of the paleo cookbook and blog Fed & Fit.

 

How’d you get into paleo?

I was reluctant at first and just gradually accepted it was the best way of eating for me. I kept gaining weight after college, I was tired all the time, so I did research on 6 or 7 diets, and I lost weight but it was from calorie restriction, which causes muscle loss as well as fat loss and creates other problems. I have a science background so I dug into some nutrition science and stumbled across the anti-inflammatory dietary direction, aka paleo.

4:00

Learning the concept to stop eating foods that make us sick and start eating foods that make us healthy because our body’s made to heal, we just have to get out of its way. Stop eating foods that cause inflammation and switch to foods that let us build and rebuild. The changes in my body were miraculous. I went grain free, drank more water, prioritized my sleep, and after 30 days I didn’t care about my weight or losing weight at that point because my joint pain and my mental fog went away. I could also sleep better at night. This was 7 years ago.

5:30

Stepping on the scale every morning also didn’t work for me, so I ditched the scale. 6-9 months into my paleo journey I had gone down 10 dress sizes but I had only lost 7 lbs because I had started doing yoga and crossfit and other activities during that time also.

8:03

The blog started very naturally just to share recipes because friends and family were asking me, “what the heck are you eating?!” I went back to school to become a nutrition consultant then I started taking on clients, and once I didn’t have time for any more one-on-one’s, I started my food and fitness program, the Fed & Fit project, and everything blossomed from there. It’s like a DIY healthy lifestyle template.

The book has the program, the four pillars of health, recipes, and reasons why all of this works. #1 is mindset, #2 is rest and hydration, #3 is nutrition (foods that sabotage vs foods that heal), and #4 is exercise.

13:00

What is the easiest way for someone to get started with this program?

Start by drinking more water. Take your body weight, divide it by 2, and that’s roughly how many ounces per day of water you should have. Make sleep a priority. There’s an easy way to calculate this for yourself in the book over the course of a week. Stop drinking diet sodas; the fake sugars create a multitude of issues in the body. Tasting that sweetness tells our brain to tell our body to prepare for sugar and it really confuses our craving cues. Artificial sweeteners become a really toxic load on our bodies in general, which gets in the way of our detox capabilities. If you’re going to have a soda, go for the real thing once a month as a treat. If you want the bubbles, drink sparkling water.

Another low-hanging fruit move for the program is to stop eating gluten-containing bread pasta and cereal grains. Replace them with carbs like squash, potatoes, beets, etc.

17:20

Thinking about long-term goals helps to create lasting healthy habits. Thinking about being able to keep up with my grandchildren someday, for example, helps me make these decisions.

Get over the idea of a holy number in terms of what you want to weigh because it has nothing to do with health. Focus on feeling good instead. Disassociate yourself from the number on the scale and think about how you feel, how rested you are, how light you are on your feet, etc.

21:00

What’s your philosophy on makeup? 

Most people use soap, shampoo, conditioner, aftershave, or moisturizer or some kind of product. If you’re trying to optimize your nutrition, what you put on your skin—(toxic goop)—will wind up in your body, which can have metabolic impact. So safer skin care is important. Beautycounter makes some really beautiful products for men and women. Primally Pure is another brand I really like using all natural ingredients.

What’s the best way to get your book and to contact you or to participate in the project?

Fedandfit.com has my podcasts, recipes and blog. My book is called Fed & Fit and it’s available on my website, Amazon and nationwide. The program is opening up to participants in January and there’s more information about this on the website.

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Cassy is the author of the paleo cookbook and blog Fed & Fit. http://traffic.libsyn.com/thecavegourmet/wildgame1_170418_ep_11_cassie_joy_garcia.mp3   How’d you get into paleo? I was reluctant at first and just gradually accepted it was the best way of ... Cassy is the author of the paleo cookbook and blog Fed & Fit. http://traffic.libsyn.com/thecavegourmet/wildgame1_170418_ep_11_cassie_joy_garcia.mp3   How’d you get into paleo? I was reluctant at first and just gradually accepted it was the best way of eating for me. I kept gaining weight after college, I was tired all the time, so I did research on […] Saskatoon Steakhouse Restaurant Greenville SC
Peter Defty: Episode 010: Optimized Fat Metabolism http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/peter-defty-episode-010-optimized-fat-metabolism/ Mon, 22 May 2017 13:19:59 +0000 http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/?p=2324

Peter is a nutritional expert and ultra athlete who developed a safe and healthy approach to fat adaptation for endurance athletes called Optimized Fat Metabolism (OFM). After getting into running around 2000, Peter went from being a carb burner with poor results to a fat burner with success in racing. He specializes in using fat as fuel.

1:30

How did you get into all of this? How can your advanced knowledge apply to our audience?

It’s important to know that the concept of OFM is all about getting our bodies back to burning fat as our aerobic fuel source. The relevance to the paleo approach is that I look towards the science of anthropology and the evolutionary pressures that shaped human beings over time. We were very robust and active and really big fat burners.

5:30

So eating meat and fat gave us big brains, which we used to develop agriculture and grains.

We got a little too smart for ourselves, developed cooking and became hunter gatherers, then developed agriculture and science, then vitamins and supplements in the 1930s, ultimately arriving at processed man-made foods, not realizing the trade-off for convenience is our health. It’s impossible to return to our original state but getting back to that robust health and fitness of our ancestors is the goal.

8:45

How do you do that with your parameters?

We’re all about metabolizing fat, but with all these fad diets people forget you have to get your body physiologically to where it can burn the fat. There’s an infinite amount of variables besides genetics—environment, stress, etc. So if a person is overweight you want to look at why they’re overweight. Men are physiologically simpler than women, and with women, it’s not just the physiology, it’s the brain hardwiring.

11:25

Why is it more difficult for women to lose weight than men?

It’s very complex. The female mammal model in nature is ultimately designed to mature, cycle, and reproduce, and probably be a little overweight. It’s  hormonally primed to be eating and saving for two, so it makes weight loss a lot more difficult. In a way, a woman has to be able to address this subconscious signaling and say, “It’s ok to let go of this extra fat.”

16:30

The trend of high-carb high-quantity meals or snacking during day is wrong. Womens’ leptin levels especially are already higher and snacking or carbs can affect this. It’s the feast or famine concept. Our ancestors used to get to snack only a few times per year, depending on when berries were ripe, for example. We can handle carbs but we’re not meant to do it 3-5 times a day for decades.

22:00

It depends on the individual to determine how many carbs one truly needs within a day or a week. Part of the problem is a cultural one too because we view drugs as bad and addictive but not carbs. They are physiologically, emotionally and mentally addictive and they create huge swings. When your blood sugar goes up and down it triggers you to think, “I gotta eat now.”

26:00

For someone who’s obese or metabolically challenged, cutting carbs the first week is probably going to leave them couched. When you’re taking away the energy you’re used to and you can’t access the energy you want to get to, it’s very difficult. Finding someone’s carbohydrate tolerance is the key.

36:41

Protein uptake is optimized when combined with fats. If you have the right balance of protein with the fat it’s pretty hard to have excess protein. It’s when you take naked protein that’s going to give you an excess, which can turn into sugar or nitrogen and work your kidneys over from trying to break down those proteins.

41:00

Most people are vitamin D deficient. The medical range is below where it should be; above 70 and below 150 nanograms seems to be a really good sweet spot.

44:00

Another metabolic engine is liver, due to the Vitamin K, but most people in the U.S. don’t eat enough organ meat. I recommend ruminate, desiccated liver tablets, or patè, foie gras, Braunschweiger, liverwurst, or rich Wellington cheeses.

48:00

Most people are magnesium and zinc deficient. You have to get enough but not too much. Eating seafood regularly is the easiest way. I recommend taking magnesium chloride at the end of a meal, as well as taking epsom salt baths. This is very helpful for people who have a hard time sleeping.

52:00

People should be aware that for women, cravings for carbohydrates are much stronger during the mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Adding inflammation will increase irritability and menstrual symptoms, so reducing carbs and insulin load helps to keep the inflammation at bay.

54:00

How does hydration play into fat adaptation?

You have to drink more water, but that requires you to take in more salt. You’re going to need those saltier foods to help you lose fat; they’re not going to make you retain water at that point. If you get out of a chair or bend over and you get dizzy or sluggish, it’s usually low blood volume and you need to increase your water or salt intake. Drinking water with salty foods will help bring your blood volume up. When you’re fat adapted, everything changes; you need more salt when you’re fat adapted.

59:00

So what is Step 1 if you’re overweight?

Seek out good information so you can wrap your head around the concept and get your psychology right and become committed to this idea. Everyone’s different and you have to be willing to experiment and stick with it for the longterm (2 years). I’ve seen many people go from morbidly obese to being very physically fit.

1:01:00

Once you see the signs of fat adaptation—where you’re not hungry, the weight is starting to come off, you start to really get into an exercise pattern—that’s when your body says, “Maybe I should conserve some of that glycogen and burn the fat.”

Go to vespapower.com or fatadaptation.com or optimizedfatmetabolism.com to learn more or contact Peter Defty.

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Peter is a nutritional expert and ultra athlete who developed a safe and healthy approach to fat adaptation for endurance athletes called Optimized Fat Metabolism (OFM). After getting into running around 2000, Peter is a nutritional expert and ultra athlete who developed a safe and healthy approach to fat adaptation for endurance athletes called Optimized Fat Metabolism (OFM). After getting into running around 2000, Peter went from being a carb burner with poor results to a fat burner with success in racing. He specializes in using fat […] Saskatoon Steakhouse Restaurant Greenville SC 1:10:40
Robb Wolf: Episode 109: Robb Wolf Wired To Eat http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/robb-wolf-episode-109-robb-wolf-wired-to-eat/ Tue, 21 Mar 2017 18:14:43 +0000 http://saskatoonrestaurant.com/?p=2221 Robb Wolf

 

A modern pioneer in the paleo movement, Robb’s shift into paleo came in the late ‘90s after debating over whether or not to go to medical school, which coincided with his health problems at the time (ulcerative colitis). He was following a high-carb low-fat vegan diet, which wasn’t working well. The end point was the idea of an ancestral health perspective that came on his radar, and once he began experimenting, it reversed his ulcerative colitis and changed his life. He worked on some papers with Dr. Loren Cordain, and he discovered an online workout called CrossFit, ultimately opening the first CrossFit-affiliate  gym in the world. He was fortunate enough to watch the paleo diet and CrossFit grow in lockstep together, from only a few hundred people on the planet knowing about these movements.

7:30

I have a lot of clients that still get caught up with dietary misperceptions, (e.g. being terrified of fat), and I’m not sure how long it takes to get beyond that.

If you can just get people eating in a way where their palate and satiety are fired in a way that we eat enough to support our activity but we’re not causing any damage to our health, that’s a big eye-opener. Usually the magic sauce for that ends up being a higher-protein, moderate-to-low-carb approach. Many people say, “You need to just eat less and move more,” but that goes against our genetic wiring. People who emphasize the “calories in, calories out” mentality are forgetting that we live in a world of hyper-palatable foods and that our fundamental genetic wiring tells us that eating as much of that as we can is a good idea. It’s only in our modern environment of plenty that that has become a liability instead of an asset.

11:00

Many of these companies are out for a profit, which requires them to sell more.

The industrialized food folks who are profiting from our situation intimately understand this ancestral health model and how our brains can be hijacked to become dependent on something, whether it’s a Facebook app or a potato chip. Yet most doctors, media and healthcare providers are still completely dismissive of the paleo diet and this idea and basically leave us to the designs of the folks that are profiting from us—junk food purveyors and media players—and offer us nothing of value in return.

14:40

It’d be interesting to take these techniques that make us unable to eat just one chip, but turn them around and use them in a healthy way.

Part of the problem is similar to the difference between chewing the coca leaf which is mildly addictive like coffee vs. refining it into cocaine and it being off-the-Richter-scale addictive. 

18:00

How do we help people rewire their thinking to turn off cravings for carbs, sugar, and wine or alcohol in the evening?

When you’re hungry, if somebody puts anything reasonable in front of you you’re going to say, “OK, I’m going to eat that.” When we’re in a mode of cravings, we’re seeking out some specific thing, and cravings are more akin to drug interactions. With things like wheat, dairy or sugar that are known to have opiate-type effects on the brain and gut, people really want these foods because they affectively become addictive and these cravings are driven because they’ve habituated to using them. The reality is that there’s going to be some struggle and discomfort in decoupling from that. Being addicted to processed foods is not that dissimilar to the process of getting cleaned up from drugs and alcohol, and there are not really any easy solutions, other than recognizing at the outset that this isn’t an easy process. Understand we are genetically wired to eat more and move less. 

22:00

If you’re wanting to get a handle on your food, you’ve got to get a handle on your sleep, which ties into the wine. Wine disorders your sleep and helps you to be unconscious but it doesn’t help you sleep, and if you’re not sleeping, you have less impulse control and a tendency to seek out salty, sweet, refined foods. Just be aware that drinking around bedtime isn’t helping your sleep and increases your tendency to choose poor food options. 

27:30

I have mixed feelings on restrictive diets or “cheat meals.” It sets people up for failure right out of the gate. A specific event like that can create an enormous amount of participatory energy, like a drug addict enjoys the process of preparing to take the drug just as much as the actual taking of the drug. That can have profound impacts on the neuro-regulation of our appetite. Be honest with yourself and know your triggers and whether or not you can have just one meal of something that’s off your food plan and not go off the rails for a week afterwards. If you eat 21 meals per week and 19 of them are tight and 2 of them are “reward meals,” just let it happen and enjoy it without drama, and then return to your food plan. 

32:20

How long does it take to rewire your brain? Does it take 30 days?

It seems like 20 or 21 days is the point where people start imprinting new habits. 30 is long enough to see some good results and provide leverage for people playing around with this process. That’s Phase 1.

Phase 2 is the 7-day carb test plan? 

That’s when folks have reset their metabolism and improved their gut health and then we see how much latitude we have with eating paleo foods vs. addictive foods. It helps people get a handle on how they respond to various types of carbohydrates via blood glucose measurements. This can be done subjectively too by merely addressing how you feel roughly 1 and 2 hours after eating a certain carb. 

38:00

What is your view of a ketogenic approach to a diet? 

I originally ate this way and I tend to feel best at the low-carb, even-ketogenic level. The one problem is if I do high-intensity activity, I find it hard to fuel that activity and I need more carbs. There is something about the ketogenic state that is particularly satiating, partly because you’re creating a state that looks like starvation. There’s a tendency for one’s appetite to be quite mellow in those situations after the first couple of days. Ketogenic diets can be an incredibly powerful tool but there is a proper application. 

42:00

How do you approach carbs and high-intensity activity?

It varies depending on when the activity is, but I usually like to have my meal finished 2 hours before the activity. If it’s earlier in the day I’ll throw in 30-40 grams of carbs with breakfast around 8 or 9am, and depending on the intensity of the training I’ll put more carbs in the post-workout meal. I like dosing more aggressively after the event vs. before. 

Go to http://robbwolf.com/wiredtoeat/ for additional information and a special pre-order bundle of Robb Wolf’s new book, which will be released on 3/21/17. 

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Robb Wolf   A modern pioneer in the paleo movement, Robb’s shift into paleo came in the late ‘90s after debating over whether or not to go to medical school, which coincided with his health problems at the time (ulcerative colitis). Robb Wolf   A modern pioneer in the paleo movement, Robb’s shift into paleo came in the late ‘90s after debating over whether or not to go to medical school, which coincided with his health problems at the time (ulcerative colitis). He was following a high-carb low-fat vegan diet, which wasn’t working well. The end […] Saskatoon Steakhouse Restaurant Greenville SC 50:16